We Love Warhol. 17 Oct 2015- 31 Jan 2016

17/10/2015 - 31/01/2016

Exhibition featuring new work and old favourites by well known pop artist from our area Diane Nowell and fine artist and first class screen printer Jérôme Hunt.
Diane Nowell: Pop Artist

Artist Statement

My art comes from how I have been shaped from life’s experiences: my work as a nurse in the forces and harder times. Art is my lifeline and an expression of who I clearly want to be and who I am fast becoming. I am confident through my art work which I treasure as valued pieces. The encouragement and belief from an art teacher way back when has bore fruit.

Originally creating portraits for friends, I offered my pop art with love as gifts. Now I get commission after commission, created I suppose with my own unique ‘makeover’. I am inspired by Warhol and Lichtenstein, the bold lines, bright colours and sheer audacity of their work. I am fascinated by the depiction of beauty, starlets and celebrity.

I paint on canvas, wood, whatever I can get my hands on. I use digital images to access the initial simplicity of the structure and then hand sketch onto the material. I then paint in various shades of grey sometimes with a shock of colour to attain the drama I seek.

Exhibitions, Galleries

Realitas Peakirk 2010-2012
Harriet’s Art Gallery Peterborough (City Treasures Oct 2011) 2011-2012
The Greenroom – Lafayette Louisiana 2013
VW bus featured in Fringe Festival Guide Philadelphia 2013
James Harper Fine Art Gallery 2013 – Present Florida
Art in the Heart Gallery, Peterborough 2012-present
Gallery Pierre Dubai 2016

Jerome Hunt: Fine Artist (Painter and Screen Printer)

Artist Statement

Screen-printing, also known as silk screening or serigraphy, is a printmaking technique that traditionally creates a sharp-edged single-colour image using a stencil supported by a porous silk-like fabric, usually fine polyester mesh. A screen-print or serigraph is an image created using this technique.
It began as an industrial technology, and was adopted by American graphic artists in the 1930s; the Pop Art movement of the 1960s further popularized the technique. Many of Andy Warhol’s most famous works were created using this method.

Traditionally screen prints were characterised by large flat areas of colour but in many of my prints you see a more diffuse lithographic quality. This is obtained by using conventional photography and some digital manipulation. I like to control colour saturation and add drawing elements into the prints to add nuances in order to bring out character and depth. I have evolved this technique by extensive experimentation in order to produce these unique and subtle results.

My studio is not ‘hi-tech’ however; I use a hand printing table and a darkroom with real film and chemicals. I make all my own screens and stencils; the whole process from conception to realisation is ‘in-house’. Every colour requires a screen to be made up and this is time consuming and intensive work. The prints in my editions mostly number between 20 – 25 impressions; the printing process is entirely manual; is very labour intensive and requires great accuracy.

My choice of imagery centres on my fascination with the way light affects colour, with an emphasis on composition and underlying abstraction. Two of my principal themes; images chosen from visits to France and America, have yielded motifs which appeal to my graphical nature although I am constantly recording ideas for new projects and print series.

This entry was posted in Exhibitions and Events. Bookmark the permalink.